Kosta Boda Mirage Large Vase Grey/Red - B000SZT634

Kosta Boda Mirage Large Vase Grey/Red - B000SZT634
Product Code: B000SZT634
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Price: $375.90 $54.89

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This fits your .
  • Enter your model number to make sure this fits.

  • Kosta Boda Mirage vase; 7-3/4 inches high

  • Lead-free crystal handcrafted by master glassmakers in Sweden

  • Designed by Swedish artist Gran Wrff

  • Clear, dense shape encases veils of color in 3 combinations

  • Smaller size available; gift-boxed; wash by hand

  • Size:Large  |  Color:Grey/Red

    Göran Wärff's signature motifs contrast of bold strokes and flows of color within heavy, brilliant crystal forms. The colors of Mirage harmonize subtly with the forms and depths of the vases, and the play of light within the crystal seems to add other forms and dimensions¿mirages, hence the name. Collectors prize Göran's Kosta Boda designs, which also make stunning gifts for crystal lovers.

    .com

    To create the Mirage vase, Swedish glass artist Göran Wärff seemingly started with a traditional yet incredibly thick cylindrical shape, arched it, and pulled one side out to form a dense wedge-like fin. Encased in the brilliantly clear lead-free crystal are veils of color in three combinations: blue/amber, red/gray, and blue/green, that shimmer and change depending on light quality, much like the mirage effect of heat in the desert. The vases are hand-crafted by master glassmakers at the Kosta Boda glassworks in Sweden, and as a result, each is unique. The large vase stands 7-3/4 inches tall; a shorter version at 6 inches is also available.

    Göran Wärff, who first designed for Kosta Boda in 1964, is known for his fluid, organic forms that are often inspired by nature. Wärff is adept at demonstrating how solid and heavy a crystal piece can be, yet at the same time buoyant, when the form is sensuous and the color spirited. A superb gift for the art collector, each glass piece arrives in a Kosta Boda box, signifying the highest artistry in both design and implementation. Washing the crystal by hand is recommended. --Ann Bieri

    From the Manufacturer

    About the Designer:

    Born in 1933, Göran Wärff has been retained by Kosta Boda since 1964 and has a studio at Kosta glassworks. "Glass is oxygen--light is energy--glass is light." So runs the mantra of Wärff, grand old man of Kosta Boda's designers. Few, if any, have such a deep feeling for the glass melt as Wärff, who has always shown special interest in preserving the traditional skills of the master craftsmen in glassblowing and glass cutting. The play of light within the clear volume of the glass and the endless optical phenomena that occur as the glass diffracts the light are a recurring theme in Wärff's art and design work. Nature and the play of light in nature are his other main sources of inspiration, beyond the glass itself. In addition to his utility glass and art glass, he has also created several large-scale installations. His work is exhibited in museums and collections around the world.

    About the Kosta Boda:

    With characteristic craftsmanship and good design, Kosta Boda has become one of the leading glasshouses in the world. The company's three glassworks in the villages of Kosta, Boda, and Åfors each have exciting individual stories of their own yet stand together under the common brand name Kosta Boda. The corps of designers currently on retainer at Kosta Boda works with both utilitarian and art glass.

    Glass results from a great many meetings between people--artists, craftspeople, and lovers of glass. The artists of Kosta Boda have a decisive role to play in all the creative stages of the process. The cooperation between the designers and the skilled craftspeople is very close; indeed, it is essential if the designers are to transfer their intentions to the glass.

    The History of Kosta Boda:

    Kosta, the parent glassworks of Kosta Boda and the oldest glassworks in Sweden still in operation, has a fascinating history that forms a valuable part of Swedish cultural heritage. The glassworks was founded in 1742 by the governors of the counties of Kronoberg and Kalmar, Anders Koskull and Georg Bogislaus Stael von Holstein, both former generals in the army of Karl XII and distinguished veterans of the battle of Narva, among others. The two county governors founded the glassworks upon the instructions of Fredrik I and modeled it on Continental glassworks. The works was situated deep in the spruce forests of Småland, on a site midway between the two country towns, and near a village that was then known as Dåfvedshult. The main reason for choosing this location was the unlimited availability of wood. Enormous quantities of wood were naturally required to keep the glassmaking furnaces burning day and night.

    Both of the founders wanted their names to be remembered, so the works was christened Kosta, from the initial letters--Ko and Sta--of the surnames of both the Carolinian generals. After a time the entire community was renamed after the growing glassworks.

    During the first 150 years, the glassworks in Kosta produced only utility glass, including window glass for the building of Tessin's Royal Palace, bottles and glass for the royal household, and chandeliers for churches. The first glassblowers were immigrant glass masters from Böhmen. They became the founding fathers of the glassblowing families, which passed down craft skills from generation to generation. Swedish sand was used to manufacture crystal glass, but nowadays pure silica sand is imported from Belgium, since the Swedish sand contains iron oxide that gives the glass a green tinge.

    Under the management of glass masters from Kosta, a succession of glassworks sprang up in the forests of Småland in the regions around Växjö and Kalmar. Kosta therefore has good reason to call itself the parent works of the entire Swedish Kingdom of Crystal.

    Until the end of the 19th century, the glass from Kosta was designed by the glassblowers themselves. At the Stockholm exhibition in 1897, the glassworks was criticized for the uniformity of its glass, which led to the idea of enlisting designers and artists in production. The first designer to be employed by Kosta was Gunnar Wennerberg. The year was 1898. Ever since then a large number of artists and designers have enriched the glassmaking tradition of the works with their artistic talents. Today Kosta Boda has a unique right to describe itself as an art industry, in which designers and craftspeople work closely together in the ongoing development of handmade utility glass and art glass. This diversity of individual artistic expression and the free and uninhibited creative process have become the distinguishing characteristics of the Kosta Boda brand.

    In addition to the parent works in Kosta, Kosta Boda today includes the two "daughter works" of Boda (founded in 1864) and Åfors (founded in 1876), a partnership that was formed in 1964. Both Boda and Åfors were originally relatively simple glassworks that manufactured utility glass. Boda experienced a period of glory in the 1960s and 1970s, under the innovative and dynamic artistic leadership of Erik Höglund, a heritage carried on by Kjell Engman and Monica Backström. Åfors has been the home of the designer couple Ulrica Hydman-Vallien and Bertil Vallien, who, together with Gunnel Sahlin and Olle Brozén, brought a renaissance to the small glassworks and local community. In 1990 Kosta was acquired by its former competitor Orrefors. Orrefors/Kosta Boda was in turn acquired by the Danish company Royal Copenhagen in 1997, and the design group Royal Scandinavia was formed. The group also includes Georg Jensen, Royal Copenhagen, and Holmegaard.

    Colorful, handmade art glass from the works in Kosta, Boda, and Åfors have made Kosta Boda one of Sweden's strongest brands and one of the world's leading glass companies. Glass from Kosta Boda is sold all over the world. Roughly 50 percent of production is sold outside Scandinavia, with some of the biggest markets in the U.S., Japan, Germany, and Australia. The origins of this glass, the living tradition of craftsmanship developed in the glassworks in Kosta, Boda, and Åfors, is a heritage that every Swede has a right to feel proud of.

    Taking Care of Kosta Boda Pieces:

    Handmade and hand-painted glass (especially the latter) does not do well in the dishwasher. Wash by hand in hot water--though not too hot--with a little washing-up liquid. Washing in very hot water will eventually destroy the luster of the glass. Rinse in water of about the same temperature as you washed it in. To avoid cracking the glass, make sure you do not expose it to excessive temperature differences. To avoid lines, dry with a soft cloth that won't shed lint. The edge of the glass is its most fragile part. When you put the glass back in the cupboard, stand it on its foot and make sure the edge does not come into contact with other glasses or objects.

    The Mark or Signature on Kosta Boda Pieces:

    Products are marked with the words Kosta Boda, the name of the artist, and the article number (seven digits). Painted pieces are signed with a painted signature with the designer's and the painter's initials. Engraved pieces also have the engraver's signature near the designer's name.

    Besides designing glass for the regular Kosta Boda collection, our artists are also free to work with art glass--limited-edition, specially signed pieces that are often much sought after by collectors. Kosta Boda art glass is divided into two categories: unique pieces and limited editions. Unique pieces are, of course, just that. No more than one piece is made of any particular item. Limited editions are manufactured in runs of between 25 and 1,000 pieces. All art glass is marked with the product number, the name of the artist, and the size of the edition so that the purchaser will know exactly how many pieces there are in that particular series. Editions comprising less than 60 pieces are individually numbered, e.g. "25/60."

    Kosta Boda Mirage Large Vase Grey/Red - B000SZT634

    Description

    This fits your .
  • Enter your model number to make sure this fits.

  • Kosta Boda Mirage vase; 7-3/4 inches high

  • Lead-free crystal handcrafted by master glassmakers in Sweden

  • Designed by Swedish artist Gran Wrff

  • Clear, dense shape encases veils of color in 3 combinations

  • Smaller size available; gift-boxed; wash by hand

  • Size:Large  |  Color:Grey/Red

    Göran Wärff's signature motifs contrast of bold strokes and flows of color within heavy, brilliant crystal forms. The colors of Mirage harmonize subtly with the forms and depths of the vases, and the play of light within the crystal seems to add other forms and dimensions¿mirages, hence the name. Collectors prize Göran's Kosta Boda designs, which also make stunning gifts for crystal lovers.

    .com

    To create the Mirage vase, Swedish glass artist Göran Wärff seemingly started with a traditional yet incredibly thick cylindrical shape, arched it, and pulled one side out to form a dense wedge-like fin. Encased in the brilliantly clear lead-free crystal are veils of color in three combinations: blue/amber, red/gray, and blue/green, that shimmer and change depending on light quality, much like the mirage effect of heat in the desert. The vases are hand-crafted by master glassmakers at the Kosta Boda glassworks in Sweden, and as a result, each is unique. The large vase stands 7-3/4 inches tall; a shorter version at 6 inches is also available.

    Göran Wärff, who first designed for Kosta Boda in 1964, is known for his fluid, organic forms that are often inspired by nature. Wärff is adept at demonstrating how solid and heavy a crystal piece can be, yet at the same time buoyant, when the form is sensuous and the color spirited. A superb gift for the art collector, each glass piece arrives in a Kosta Boda box, signifying the highest artistry in both design and implementation. Washing the crystal by hand is recommended. --Ann Bieri

    From the Manufacturer

    About the Designer:

    Born in 1933, Göran Wärff has been retained by Kosta Boda since 1964 and has a studio at Kosta glassworks. "Glass is oxygen--light is energy--glass is light." So runs the mantra of Wärff, grand old man of Kosta Boda's designers. Few, if any, have such a deep feeling for the glass melt as Wärff, who has always shown special interest in preserving the traditional skills of the master craftsmen in glassblowing and glass cutting. The play of light within the clear volume of the glass and the endless optical phenomena that occur as the glass diffracts the light are a recurring theme in Wärff's art and design work. Nature and the play of light in nature are his other main sources of inspiration, beyond the glass itself. In addition to his utility glass and art glass, he has also created several large-scale installations. His work is exhibited in museums and collections around the world.

    About the Kosta Boda:

    With characteristic craftsmanship and good design, Kosta Boda has become one of the leading glasshouses in the world. The company's three glassworks in the villages of Kosta, Boda, and Åfors each have exciting individual stories of their own yet stand together under the common brand name Kosta Boda. The corps of designers currently on retainer at Kosta Boda works with both utilitarian and art glass.

    Glass results from a great many meetings between people--artists, craftspeople, and lovers of glass. The artists of Kosta Boda have a decisive role to play in all the creative stages of the process. The cooperation between the designers and the skilled craftspeople is very close; indeed, it is essential if the designers are to transfer their intentions to the glass.

    The History of Kosta Boda:

    Kosta, the parent glassworks of Kosta Boda and the oldest glassworks in Sweden still in operation, has a fascinating history that forms a valuable part of Swedish cultural heritage. The glassworks was founded in 1742 by the governors of the counties of Kronoberg and Kalmar, Anders Koskull and Georg Bogislaus Stael von Holstein, both former generals in the army of Karl XII and distinguished veterans of the battle of Narva, among others. The two county governors founded the glassworks upon the instructions of Fredrik I and modeled it on Continental glassworks. The works was situated deep in the spruce forests of Småland, on a site midway between the two country towns, and near a village that was then known as Dåfvedshult. The main reason for choosing this location was the unlimited availability of wood. Enormous quantities of wood were naturally required to keep the glassmaking furnaces burning day and night.

    Both of the founders wanted their names to be remembered, so the works was christened Kosta, from the initial letters--Ko and Sta--of the surnames of both the Carolinian generals. After a time the entire community was renamed after the growing glassworks.

    During the first 150 years, the glassworks in Kosta produced only utility glass, including window glass for the building of Tessin's Royal Palace, bottles and glass for the royal household, and chandeliers for churches. The first glassblowers were immigrant glass masters from Böhmen. They became the founding fathers of the glassblowing families, which passed down craft skills from generation to generation. Swedish sand was used to manufacture crystal glass, but nowadays pure silica sand is imported from Belgium, since the Swedish sand contains iron oxide that gives the glass a green tinge.

    Under the management of glass masters from Kosta, a succession of glassworks sprang up in the forests of Småland in the regions around Växjö and Kalmar. Kosta therefore has good reason to call itself the parent works of the entire Swedish Kingdom of Crystal.

    Until the end of the 19th century, the glass from Kosta was designed by the glassblowers themselves. At the Stockholm exhibition in 1897, the glassworks was criticized for the uniformity of its glass, which led to the idea of enlisting designers and artists in production. The first designer to be employed by Kosta was Gunnar Wennerberg. The year was 1898. Ever since then a large number of artists and designers have enriched the glassmaking tradition of the works with their artistic talents. Today Kosta Boda has a unique right to describe itself as an art industry, in which designers and craftspeople work closely together in the ongoing development of handmade utility glass and art glass. This diversity of individual artistic expression and the free and uninhibited creative process have become the distinguishing characteristics of the Kosta Boda brand.

    In addition to the parent works in Kosta, Kosta Boda today includes the two "daughter works" of Boda (founded in 1864) and Åfors (founded in 1876), a partnership that was formed in 1964. Both Boda and Åfors were originally relatively simple glassworks that manufactured utility glass. Boda experienced a period of glory in the 1960s and 1970s, under the innovative and dynamic artistic leadership of Erik Höglund, a heritage carried on by Kjell Engman and Monica Backström. Åfors has been the home of the designer couple Ulrica Hydman-Vallien and Bertil Vallien, who, together with Gunnel Sahlin and Olle Brozén, brought a renaissance to the small glassworks and local community. In 1990 Kosta was acquired by its former competitor Orrefors. Orrefors/Kosta Boda was in turn acquired by the Danish company Royal Copenhagen in 1997, and the design group Royal Scandinavia was formed. The group also includes Georg Jensen, Royal Copenhagen, and Holmegaard.

    Colorful, handmade art glass from the works in Kosta, Boda, and Åfors have made Kosta Boda one of Sweden's strongest brands and one of the world's leading glass companies. Glass from Kosta Boda is sold all over the world. Roughly 50 percent of production is sold outside Scandinavia, with some of the biggest markets in the U.S., Japan, Germany, and Australia. The origins of this glass, the living tradition of craftsmanship developed in the glassworks in Kosta, Boda, and Åfors, is a heritage that every Swede has a right to feel proud of.

    Taking Care of Kosta Boda Pieces:

    Handmade and hand-painted glass (especially the latter) does not do well in the dishwasher. Wash by hand in hot water--though not too hot--with a little washing-up liquid. Washing in very hot water will eventually destroy the luster of the glass. Rinse in water of about the same temperature as you washed it in. To avoid cracking the glass, make sure you do not expose it to excessive temperature differences. To avoid lines, dry with a soft cloth that won't shed lint. The edge of the glass is its most fragile part. When you put the glass back in the cupboard, stand it on its foot and make sure the edge does not come into contact with other glasses or objects.

    The Mark or Signature on Kosta Boda Pieces:

    Products are marked with the words Kosta Boda, the name of the artist, and the article number (seven digits). Painted pieces are signed with a painted signature with the designer's and the painter's initials. Engraved pieces also have the engraver's signature near the designer's name.

    Besides designing glass for the regular Kosta Boda collection, our artists are also free to work with art glass--limited-edition, specially signed pieces that are often much sought after by collectors. Kosta Boda art glass is divided into two categories: unique pieces and limited editions. Unique pieces are, of course, just that. No more than one piece is made of any particular item. Limited editions are manufactured in runs of between 25 and 1,000 pieces. All art glass is marked with the product number, the name of the artist, and the size of the edition so that the purchaser will know exactly how many pieces there are in that particular series. Editions comprising less than 60 pieces are individually numbered, e.g. "25/60."

    Kosta Boda Mirage Large Vase Grey/Red - B000SZT634

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